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In this Miniature Poodle book we will explore their temperament, their health issues and their origins. Chihuahua: Training, Grooming, and Dog Care. Hope Bordeaux.

Dogs 101 - Poodle

Buying and Raising a Chihuahua. Cheri Hill. How to Train Your Rottweiler. Mary Lambert. Poodle: Training, Grooming, and Dog Care. Valerie Fulton. Boxer: Training, Grooming, and Dog Care. Ian K. English Bulldogs for Beginners. Geraldine Pettiford. Miniature Australian Shepherds for Beginners. Lindsey Hudgens. Havaneses for Beginners. Sara Fitzgerald. A Beginners Guide to African Boerboels. Estella Scott. How to Breed your French Bulldog. Jacquie Dollins. Jaime Cabet. A Beginners Guide to Basset Hounds. Harry Roosevelt. The Golden Retriever as a Family Pet.

Nancy Dembeck. Michael Nantz. Akitas for Beginners. Stan Krendal. Cairn Terriers for Beginners. Samantha Wilson. Beagles: Dog Books for Kids.

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Doberman Pinschers. Pauline T. Bull Terriers for Beginners. Basenjis for Beginners. Marty Klein. Airedale Terriers for Beginners. Michelle Ashley. Yorkshire Terriers: Dog Books for Kids. How to Breed your Rottweiler Responsibly. A Beginners Guide to Dogue de Bordeauxs. She's a small chihuahua by the way! I lef the room, thinking she would follow and I just continued into the other end of the house. About two minutes later, I noticed my Chihuahua, heading out of the back end of the house where my room was with the donut in her mouth!

But when I opened my mouth to her and started to comment on her having found the donut, and I didn't even chide her, my voice was probably sensed as only surprised, but nevertheless, she dropped the donut and put her tail between her legs big time and dropped down as low as she could get to the ground and cowered away in fear of reprisal for having stolen the donut!

Wouldn't this qualify as "guilt" and or "shame"?

The Other Dog by Madeleine L'Engle

I was actually surprised, because while my parents don't feed her much table food, or human food, I often do and so she is used to accepting food from me on a daily basis! I thought that she would not have shown any guilt for taking my donut, but I am wondering if she has even made the association about food taken from my hand as "allowed" and food that she took that was not from my hand as, "troublesome" or "dangerous" because she felt that she was not permitted to have it or something!

As simple as most dog emotions are, I still love their little simple emotions and they translate into big emotions for me, even complex ones. I loved this little display of guilt over a donut, toooooo cute indeed! So happy to see this chart in this article covering what they claim is the cut off for emotional kinds in dogs, and even though I think it's excluding some valid dog emotions, it was still very interesting to see indeed, thank you!

The question isn't about which emotions dogs may experience, because the neurochemical system for all of mammals are nearly the same. Humans just have bigger brain to describe feelings in a abstract way. I try to see animals in the way I see some humans with autism that also have abilities beyond a normal adult person. For instance schimpanzees have much better working memory than humans.

Much like some autistic persons have. Regarding National geographic article do animals feel depressed" if deep sadness is depressed. Of Course they do. Only a fool would argue they can't feel happiness. As far as training, simple. Treat them as you would a yr. This is for those of you who think your canine can't feel sadness.

Just because a creature is unable to speak English, doesn't mean it can't feel emotion. Just ask an Italian. Until then sadness will rule her days. How about comparing canines that are talked to since birth. To a canine that is left in the back yard, only to be greeted for a moment while they fill its food bowl. While stepping gingerly to avoid its own waste.

I'm sure these 2 types differ!!! It would take far too long to describe 10 yrs, of happiness, sadness, pain, loneliness, joy. In the end it's pretty simple, for those of us that have spent years with our loved ones, whether they be an autistic 40 yr old male, or 10 yr old bear. If you cannot tell that your canine has feelings, of happiness, sadness,loneliness Imagine you were one of the animal world, would you want to be subject to a space, with no interaction How about you set up your video camera, with an 8 hr tape.

Does while your gone". I have a few Let's just say, only a fool could argue, that a canine doesn't feel happiness, sadness, fear, or joy As you did say " you will kill her" if you remove prednisone. Bedrest, ice packs, Turmeric, have done what you said it wouldn't. Remember Hippocrates? Or the Bar against everlasting ignorance? Contempt prior to investigation. America thinks it has come so far, yet can't tell their canines feel emotion. In years or less you vets will be considered Barbaric.


  • Four Winds-One Storm: The Bone Brick City.
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  • Spiritual Guide To Riches.

Let's just say that time is here. When I praise this 10 yr old pom.. When it's she heads for the door, awaiting her momma. Regardless of what I'm doing. When were gone, She cries like a baby, 4 hrs of videotape I could go on, regarding diet, tumeric, coconut oil, bone, chicken, The vets across america, insistence on drugs like Quellin, prednisone, which IMO will put a smile on the ignorant canine steward, but will in the end kill most canines Old toddler.

Nap time, play time, eat time Or a canine caged in a home? Or another example at the Inhumane society, caged I'm sorry but this article was worthless to me and I'm sorry I wasted my time reading it.

Did I miss where you cite scientific studies to support your blanket statements? Would you like to bother to define any of the emotions you list? For example, please just tell me how you define guilt? Tell me also how you would recognize the feeling of guilt in a human incapable of communicating with language? Like many others, I question the conclusion that dogs cannot feel shame or pride.

I believe that not all dogs may be capable of more complex emotions like shame or embarrasment, but some definitely are. My dad had a very smart bird hunting Black Lab when I growing up.

Patellar luxation in dogs

This dog was one of the smartest I have ever seen to this day. I saw her experience many "complex" emotions that could not be mistaken for anything else. Heres some examples: We were out hunting. There was a place with a rickety old bridge with holes in it over a river. We and the dog had crossed it hundreds of times over the years. One day we were walking across when a flock of ducks flew low overhead. The dog looked up as she was walking and stepped right into a large hole and went into the river. It wasnt a far drop at all, like 5 feet.

She wasnt hurt, but probably startled. She swam to the bank and walked back to us as we laughed. I swear if dogs blushed she would have been bright red. She wasnt afraid at all, there was no fear in her body language. And I have seen her afraid, with a lowered head, tucked tail, shivering, tight pulled back ears and bent legs. Her body language was the body language of embarrasment or shame. Her head was lowered and she kept looking up at us and looking away and her ears were back, but not strongly. There was no other fear sign. Her tail was wagging slowly.

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We patted her, chuckling, and told her she was a good dog and she perked up a bit, but was still embarrased. She then carefully walked across the bridge. Another time, she leapt on a pheasant hiding in a bush we didnt see as we walked by she held it by its breast as it flapped in her face, until my dad took it fron her and dispatched it. Before she was praised as my dad dealt with the pheasant her head was up high, her tail out, her eyes bright and ears alert. It was the look of a being proud of her actions, there was no mistaking it. Once she was profusely praised, she opened her mouth in a doggy grin and bounded about joyfully with her head high and tail wagging.

She carried herself proudly for the next hour or so. There was no mistaking her behavior in both of those times. One was embarrasment or shame, definitely not fear and the other was satisfaction at ones own actions or pride, not just reacting to praise because she expressed the emotion before being praised by the humans. She knew she did something cool and expressed it. Regardless of our ability to prove or disprove canine emotions like jealousy.

I err on the side of interpreting them. When I give Candy attention, Bella gets aggressive, unless I share affection with her at the same time. It's clear to me, just because you can't prove something, doesn't disprove it. I agree with anyone, that treats their canines like a 2 year old toddler. Are they less deserving because some of you, can't decipher their emotions? Give them all they give you. They deserve it. I have read before that the shame response is simply fear.

My question would be, 'How do you know? Or are you making an assumption? What really caught my attention was "Dogs even have the hormone oxytocin, which, in humans, is involved with feeling love and affection for others. I really believe that animals, especially dogs are much smarter than we give them credit for, we simply haven't yet found the means to empirically test such things as range of emotions. Stanley Coren, Ph. Breeders can affect the sex distribution in an unborn litter of puppies. Some researchers worry that dog urine has negative effects on city landscapes. Back Psychology Today.

Back Find a Therapist. Back Get Help. Back Magazine. Subscribe Issue Archive. Back Today. Why Are Symmetrical Faces so Attractive? Anxiety, the Endless Alarm. Stanley Coren PhD. Follow me on Twitter. Dogs have the same emotions as a human 2 year-old child. Be sure to read the following responses to this post by our bloggers:. Submitted by ownedbyshelties on March 15, - am. This seems to be a uniquely Sheltie behaviour. Dog emotions are not developed enough for jealous behavior.

What you are saying is he felt jealous and then came up with a premeditated action. They do not work that, dogs are not manipulative. What probably happened was the dog was not socialized enough and visitors are a disruption to his normal routine and environment. When this happen you commonly get results like that.

The dog tries to get your attention that way to alert you. I remember when my dog was about 6. He was barking hopelessly when He saw a female dog - seemed to be his friend - making love with another male dog. Was it a feeling of jealousy or simply a fear of loosing his partnet?

I am so confused if it was the emotion caused by other plural emotions. Very interesting article. I always thought animals were capable of guilt too, but the conclusions drawn in this article are surprising. Fascinating article. I kind of disagree, based on empirical evidence from my dog, on the statement that they do not experience shame, or pride.

For example, when he was with us, he was dominated and would do what we asked of him, like sitting and giving his paw in exchange for a snack; if we asked him to do the same thing in front of others both strangers and people whom he met for the first time , he would refuse. He would't make a fuss or anything, but he wouldn't do it, as if he were ashamed of showing those people that he was submissive. Your pup may have been feeling shy or suspicious-two emotions shown to be capable by dogs in this article- about performing these tasks in front strangers, rather than ashamed of showing those people he was submissive.

Just a thought, but who knows. That's not shame, it's actually very common, it's just a lack of reinforcement in a new environment. Asking a dog to sit in your livingroom isn't the same as asking them to sit in a park, or in front of strangers, because it's a new environment. You have to condition the behavior in different environments to get consistent results. Dog trainers call it "proofing" or "generalization".

Also, dogs do not care about "dominance" or "submissiveness". This is an old myth based on one study done in wolves that was actually disproven years ago. Google 'The Dominance Myth'. A great resource for science-based dog traning is Dr. Also the new book "Decoding your Dog" written by veterinary animal behaviorists. It makes sense. I would agree from experience that they don't feel pride like we do eg I am more beautiful than you.

However I do feel they experience some emotion for a job well done, whatever you want to label it. My nervous Staffie, Patch, loves tracking, and after a successful track, his behaviour is markedly different. He prances along, seemingly very happy with himself, very confident. I rarely see him like that except after he has achieved something.

Like you, Liz and like Lauretana, I question the conclusions of the article that dogs do not feel pride and shame. For one thing, in the analysis the article gives us about human development, the development of these emotions is a matter of only a few months more. So in this model of understanding dog emotions based on human development, pride and shame are clearly in the zone of uncertainty. In training my Lab I believe yes subjectively I see indications of pride. I have trained her to run in the direction that I point; then I throw the ball out ahead of her with the game being to get the timing and distance correct for her to catch the ball on first bounce.

This makes it a sports challenge for both of us. Good fun. Now, if I point her in a direction, and after she has started running I shout her name and point her back in the opposite direction -- so she has to run past me -- I swear yes, subjectively that she runs at absolutely tip-top speed as she runs past me. I interpret this as a prideful display. She knows I am watching when she is so close.

For the animal psychologists, I imagine these final emotions -- pride, shame, guilt, contempt -- are particularly problematic to accept because they imply a sense of 'self'. If you have a sense of self, you are getting awfully close to 'consciousness'. For all of the historical religious reasons that Dr. Coren mentioned, I suspect many of us still have an aversion to imagining that an animal can possess consciousness. Having trained dogs professionally for over thirty years I have seen the confusion created by articles and advice from many animal behaviorists.

One veterinarian told me that, after bringing his dog to me, he realized just how much bad advice and disinformation in general was being generated from so many in the animal care field. What emotions can a dog feel? I really don't know. And furthermore I don't care nor do I need to. All I need to know, to keep a dog from becoming a neurotic mess is a few simple things. Is this a positive or negative experience for the dog and is that what I want the animal to experience at the moment? What other stimuli or sensory input, besides what I am providing, is the dog associating with this experience?

What is the quality of leadership being provided by the owner? Is the owner showing dominance or submission? If the owner is dominant is their dominance destructive or positive? If the owner is submissive is it from lack of knowledge or an ingrained sense of magical thinking?

The first I can fix, the second is hopeless When training an exercise, are all my ducks in a row? These "ducks" are Drive, Cue, Response and Reward. To provide a quality world for your dog one does not need to worry about any emotional qualities the dog may or may not have. In fact all this anthropomorphic thinking just gets in the way of the quality leadership all dogs crave.

Train your dog, with all your "ducks" in a row, provide an appropriate outlet for it's desire to chase and fight through play for most owners and you will have a great dog who's emotions, whatever they may be, will take care of themselves. I feel sorry for you that your experience of pets is purely based on power rather than love or joy or companionship. Yours is the same paradigm governing the mind of the domestic abuser: teaching "respect" through fear. Fortunately, no respected animal behaviorist supports this negative training approach.

But the other day I had left a donut on my bed nightstand on accident in my room. She was on the bed with me. She's a small chihuahua by the way! I lef the room, thinking she would follow and I just continued into the other end of the house. About two minutes later, I noticed my Chihuahua, heading out of the back end of the house where my room was with the donut in her mouth!

But when I opened my mouth to her and started to comment on her having found the donut, and I didn't even chide her, my voice was probably sensed as only surprised, but nevertheless, she dropped the donut and put her tail between her legs big time and dropped down as low as she could get to the ground and cowered away in fear of reprisal for having stolen the donut!

Wouldn't this qualify as "guilt" and or "shame"? I was actually surprised, because while my parents don't feed her much table food, or human food, I often do and so she is used to accepting food from me on a daily basis! I thought that she would not have shown any guilt for taking my donut, but I am wondering if she has even made the association about food taken from my hand as "allowed" and food that she took that was not from my hand as, "troublesome" or "dangerous" because she felt that she was not permitted to have it or something!

As simple as most dog emotions are, I still love their little simple emotions and they translate into big emotions for me, even complex ones. I loved this little display of guilt over a donut, toooooo cute indeed! So happy to see this chart in this article covering what they claim is the cut off for emotional kinds in dogs, and even though I think it's excluding some valid dog emotions, it was still very interesting to see indeed, thank you!

The question isn't about which emotions dogs may experience, because the neurochemical system for all of mammals are nearly the same. Humans just have bigger brain to describe feelings in a abstract way. I try to see animals in the way I see some humans with autism that also have abilities beyond a normal adult person. For instance schimpanzees have much better working memory than humans.

Much like some autistic persons have. Regarding National geographic article do animals feel depressed" if deep sadness is depressed. Of Course they do. Only a fool would argue they can't feel happiness. As far as training, simple. Treat them as you would a yr. This is for those of you who think your canine can't feel sadness. Just because a creature is unable to speak English, doesn't mean it can't feel emotion. Just ask an Italian. Until then sadness will rule her days. How about comparing canines that are talked to since birth.

To a canine that is left in the back yard, only to be greeted for a moment while they fill its food bowl. While stepping gingerly to avoid its own waste. I'm sure these 2 types differ!!! It would take far too long to describe 10 yrs, of happiness, sadness, pain, loneliness, joy. In the end it's pretty simple, for those of us that have spent years with our loved ones, whether they be an autistic 40 yr old male, or 10 yr old bear. If you cannot tell that your canine has feelings, of happiness, sadness,loneliness Imagine you were one of the animal world, would you want to be subject to a space, with no interaction How about you set up your video camera, with an 8 hr tape.

Does while your gone". I have a few Let's just say, only a fool could argue, that a canine doesn't feel happiness, sadness, fear, or joy As you did say " you will kill her" if you remove prednisone. Bedrest, ice packs, Turmeric, have done what you said it wouldn't. Remember Hippocrates? Or the Bar against everlasting ignorance? Contempt prior to investigation. America thinks it has come so far, yet can't tell their canines feel emotion.

In years or less you vets will be considered Barbaric. Let's just say that time is here. When I praise this 10 yr old pom.. When it's she heads for the door, awaiting her momma. Regardless of what I'm doing. When were gone, She cries like a baby, 4 hrs of videotape I could go on, regarding diet, tumeric, coconut oil, bone, chicken, The vets across america, insistence on drugs like Quellin, prednisone, which IMO will put a smile on the ignorant canine steward, but will in the end kill most canines